Logo
1942 Michigan Football Team | bigbluefootballhistory.com Go Blue Michigan Football | Go Blue Michigan Football History | M Go Blue Football | M Go Blue Football History | Michigan Football History | Michigan Wolverine Football History

April 5, 2018 Happy Birthday Anniversary Robert C. Kolesar!

Posted on April 5, 2018 by Barry Gallagher

Today is another great day to celebrate the Happy Birthday Anniversary of a Michigan Wolverine named Robert C. Kolesar. According to the Wikipedia article linked below, Robert C. “Bob” Kolesar was born on this day in Cleveland, Ohio. He is another Buckeye who saw the light and came to Ann Arbor to play football and study medicine at Michigan.

Part I. Wolverine of the Day – Robert C. Kolesar

Robert C. Kolesar came to play football for Michigan and Fritz Crisler in 1939. He spent his freshman year  learning the Michigan system and he learned his lessons well. He started three games at guard in 1940 and played well enough to earn his first varsity letter at the end of the season. Michigan posted a record of 7-1-0 in 1940 and won 3 games and lost 1 in the Big Ten.

Kolesar made things easy on Coach Fritz Crisler during his last two seasons. Crisler just penciled the hard-charging Kolesar into the starting lineup for every game so that he could focus on other matters. Bob Kolesar was not flashy, but he was very good at knocking people down on offense and tackling them on defense. He started 18 straight games during his final two season for the Wolverines. Michigan posted a record of 20 wins 5 loses and1 tie when Bob Kolesar played for Michigan which means that the Maize and Blue footballers won just under seventy-nine percent of their games (.788). Michigan also did well in Big Ten play during the Kolesar Years, but not as well as he probably would have liked. The Wolverines posted a record of 9-4-1 in conference play for a winning rate of just over sixty-seven percent (.678).

Robert C. Kolesar Michigan Football 1942 | bigbluefootballhistory.com

Robert C. Kolesar earned three varsity letters at Michigan from 1940-1942. He was one of the fabled “seven Oak Posts.” Photo courtesy of the Bentley Historical Library at The University of Michgian.

Bob Kolesar became famous in Michigan Football lore when a writer tagged him, and his fellow lineman  as the “Seven Oak Posts.” All seven men who played on the line in 1942 were 60-minute players. They were as solid and sturdy as oak posts and they hit just as hard! They were on the field for the opening kickoff and stayed there until the end of the game. Of course, that doesn’t happen in college football anymore! Here are names of the famous lineman: Center-Merv Pregulman, Right Guard-Julius Franks, Left Guard-Robert C. Kolesar, Left End-Elmer Madar, Right End-Phil Sharp, Right Tackle-Bill Pritula, and Left Tackle-Albert Wistert.

Please enjoy your Thursday Wolverine fans and take time to remember a true Wolverine legend. Dr. Robert C. Kolesar practiced medicine in Michigan for many years. He lived a long and fruitful life. Kolesar left his family, friends and admirers on January 13, 2004 at the age of eighty-two. Let’s celebrate his life again on the ninety-eighth anniversary of his birth. May Dr. Bob Kolesar always rest in eternal peace. Go Blue!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Kolesar

http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/football/fbteam/1942fbt.htm

University of 

Part II. Trivia Question of the Day – April 4, 2018

Who was Fritz Crisler’s first captain at Michigan?

Part II. Trivia Question – Answer of the Day April 4, 2018 – Fred Janke

Fred Janke lettered on three Michigan Football teams from 1935 to 1938. At the end of the 1937 season, the hard-working Janke was elected to serve as Michigan’s captain in 1938. He helped lead Fritz Crisler’s first football team to a final record of 6-1-1. The Wolverines ended the Big Ten season in a tie for second place with a record of 3 wins, 1 loss and 1 tie.

Part III. Trivia Question of the Day – April 5, 2018

Who was the first Michigan Wolverine to rush for over 200-yards against Ohio State?

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *